Tuesday, October 24, 2006

One mankind

This weekend Mtn Brook High School and Fairfield prep came together to perform an absolutely spectacular performance of To Kill A Mocking Bird. The central theme behind this performance is the racial issues between blacks and whites. Both theater teachers wanted to get these two schools together, neither one containing any race other than white or black, to show them that the only difference is the color of skin. Garth Brooks, a famous country singer, wrote a famous song called "We Shall Be Free" containing these lyrics, "
And when money talks for the very last timeAnd nobody walks a step behind When there's only one race and that's mankind..."

Tell of a time you have heard of or have judged someone based on their skin color or ethnicity, but realized your judgment was wrong and that there is only one race being mankind.-JMM

21 comments:

MaryEvelynP3 said...

As a child I grew up visiting my grandmother very often in Tuscaloosa. One time her house keeper, an older black lady brought her grand daughter over while she worked. Growing up in Mountain Brook, I frankly had had little to no experience really talking to and meeting black people. As embarrassed as I am now to admit, the initial meeting of Emma was simply uncomfortable. I did not know how to act; I felt like because her skin looked so different than mine, she must be different. However, it was not long before Emma and I were good friends, playing together happily. I quickly learned race is not very separating after all.

FrankB3 said...

Once upon a time I worked in a retirement home. I thought my coworkers were pretty much ignorant. Some of them were pretty intellegent. I eventually realized we are all pretty much the same. Our intellegent levels may difer and our views but at the end of the day were all the same.

jessanneh3 said...

I have a housekeeper named Lucy. Lucy is not just an ordinary housekeeper. She is absolutely amazing. When she first started working for us, I was a little skeptical about her. But, as the time went by I realized that Lucy was an incredible lady. Lucy grew to be like a best friend to me. She would take care of me when my parents went out of town and I loved it when she would stay with me. I learned to not judge people by the way they look and that if you give someone a chance to get to know them then your opinions will change. Lucy is wonderful to my family and me and I love her to death.

AshleyB5 said...

So just like every other American after 9/11 I was terrified of getting on an airplane. I remember the first flight after the accident that I flew on was to Orlando, Florida. I have never been so terrified in my life and just to scare my 8th grade mind even more I sat next to a man of Middle Eastern descent. I prayed and held my teddy bear for the firsts half of the flight but finally opened up and talked to him and realized that he was a really cool, and nice guy.

chriso5 said...

I remember one time at a baseball camp, there was this black kid that I was rooming with. I hadn't met him yet, but I had heard he was black. All the other guys in the surrounding rooms (white guys) were talking about how my roomate would probably be the fastest guy there and making jokes just because he was black. After talking to my roomie for a while, I realized he was a really cool guy and I liked him a lot. He also turned out to be the fastest kid there.

chuckw7 said...

I of all people am very quick to judge. I remember when I was nine and playing soccer that there was an African American on the other team. I didn't think that there was anyway he could be good at soccer but I realized soon how wrong I was in my judgement. I don't think I have ever played against someone of that caliber in my career yet. The moves that he could do were utterly amazing. I learned on that day that color doesn't mean anything.

Leigh W. 1 said...

Well actually you are wrong when you say that we only have whites at our school. There's not much guessing invovled in finding out who this is. This girl is also on my volleyball team and this was her first year on varsity. We had our annual team bonding trip to the beach over the summer and we discovered that looks can be decieving. Don't get me wrong, her running jump is 10'4'' or something and she just won state in high jump. however, when you ask her to do anything musical you might get her beatbox confused with someone extremely white. Skin has nothing to do with anything. Yes, race does give people a different enviroment to grow up in and different characteristics come with that but in the end everyone is about the same.

willst5 said...

I agree with you Mrs. C. I loved the play alot. I think we should buy a class set of the play so we can watch it anytime we want. I also agree with the diversity issues you presented.

JimW3 said...

I went up to JH Ranch in California this summer. I had been in the past and there weren't any black people, but this time there were. I was very skeptical at first because they were always joking around and making trouble, but on our 7 hour bus ride I ended up sitting next to one of the black guys. It took me a while to get comfortable but after a while we started talking. He turned out to be a really great guy and I felt bad that I had been worried about sitting next to him.

JayF3 said...

Baseball has taught me many things, and judging someone by race is definitely one of them. There is a common joke in baseball which says black players cannot hit curve balls. When I was pitching against Pelham, they had a black second baseman who was a great ball player and one of their teams best hitters. When he came up to bat, I threw him the curve on the first pitch and he missed it by two feet. The second curve ball I threw to him he hit off of the right field wall. I learned that race has absolutely nothing to do with hitting a curveball.

GingerC1 said...

I work at a restaurant where there are mexican cooks. At first, I only looked at them as the Mexicans, but the more I work with them the more I realize that they are just like us. They are some of the hardest workers I know. They always seem to go the extra mile and are really nice. Before, I always thought Mexicans were sketchy, but I came to realize they are alot like us. They impress me how they come to America at 17 and work 40 hours a week so they can send money home to Mexico. I think we sometimes overlook the cooks and do not give them the credit we should.

DavidW3 said...

I went to Camp Nebaghamon in Wisconsin about 5 years ago. In my cabin there was a black kid who was from Chicago. I had not had many interactions with black kids my age because there aren't any black kids in Mountain Brook. I was somewhat nervous to talk to him, because I was not sure if we would have much in common. Eventually, we were paired up for a ice breaker game and during the game I began to get a good idea of what kind of a person he was. Throughout camp we became good friends and I still talk to him to this day.

MaryCatherineS1 said...

This is really mean to say, but growing up in Mountain Brook, I haven't been around that many people of a different race unless I was with a group of people somewhere. A few months ago I met this person whose roommate was black. At first, I questioned my friend about his roommate because I didn't believe that he would really room with someone like that. I was hesitant to hang out with him at first because I was not sure about his roommate, but when I finally did hang out with him and decided to meet the other guy, he turned out to be probably the funniest, nicest person I have ever met!! Now, I feel bad for judging him before I ever met him.

FrannieC5 said...

When I was about 5, both of my parents had a job, and me and my brother needed a full time babysitter. My parents finally hired a black women named Cilia. She was the nicest lady! She was so cool, and even let me stay up past my bedtime, and let me eat ice cream. She was my babysitter for another 5 years, and then she was too old to handle us. She was the coolest nanny that I have had.

CaseyF5 said...

Growing up, I had a black housekeeper named Beverly. She always cleaned the house really well and never did anything wrong. Then one day my favorite doll went missing and I blamed her. My mom got really mad at me and said that Beverly would never do something like that. Of course I had just left my doll in the car and Beverly never stole anything. But being young and never exposed to black people I automatically assumed it was her. Now, one of my best friends on my soccer team is black and she is like the coolest person ever. After that incident I learned that race has nothing to do with the person inside. I am now ashamed that I ever could have thought that.

Brooke L. said...

I heard a commercial on the radio that i believe accurately demonstated some people's stereo types on minorities. It was a white male who called fake looking for apartments and tried talking to the landlord in black lingo with the name Jamarcus Johnson and then a Arabic accent with the name Siad Mahul and then one with the name Arthur Wellingham, to the first two she said ," im sorry there are no more avaliable apartments" but to "mr. wellingham" there were all of a sudden apartments avaliable...surprising?

MeredithA3 said...

I was bascially raised to treat everyone with the same respect including people of different races or ethnic backgrounds. From the time I was born until I was in the third grade, my sister and I had a nanny that we called Nanna and she is this really big, black woman. I remember going over to her tiny house and meeting her grandchildren. My sister and I did not really think anything of them becuase we were so young and we were taught to not treat anyone different. I thought the the play was amazing and it can truly teach any human being to respect other people as you would like to be respected.

laceys7 said...

When I played basketball, I went to a basketball camp and Alabama each summer. Well my first year I went, I didn't sign up to room with any of my friends in time, so I was put with a complete stranger. This complete stranger just happened to be a black girl. As a result of not being with my friends and having a black roomate when I had had little personal experience with people of another race, I was very shy. However, she was very enthusiastic about becoming friends and it wasn't long until we were staying up late looking at each other's pictures from the school year.

Jason R. 1 said...

Working at a restaurant there are all different kinds of people. I have had co-workers who were midgets, gay, black, mexican, and asian, and I enjoy working with them all. It is great to have a sense of diversity in my life. Sometimes there is problems with dividing up tables amongst the servers. I have seen times where my black co-workers don't get as many tables as my other co-workers. I feel very lucky to be able to work with people who come from all sorts of backgrounds..instead of just the regular old "Mountain Brook ALL WHITE" family.

MaryaliceL1 said...

Last summer i started working at Soca, which is downtown in five points south. Coming from Mountain Brook, it was a realty check to see what went on. People walk around in hot pants, dress up like Jesus, and bums surround the streets. At first it scared me to death, which is why i now carry mase with me everywhere. But then you get to talking to the people downtown and they happen to be really friendly. I think that most of our school isn't well diversified with other ethnic groups or races so, since we don't know any better, it almost turns into a prejudiceness. But when i started being surrounded by these people, it opened up my eyes, showing me that not everyone is the stereotype of their race, religion, or ethnic group. Although you do see these "stereotypical" people quite often, you cannot justify everyone to be like that.

adamso7 said...

When I was at a church downtown working in the kitchen and serving food in the line. There were alot of people that came in that were black, and they looked like they were below people I was accustomed to hagging out with. It was when the seventh person walked in and surprised my through his deciving looks. Big Mike as he is called is the nicest and most interesting person that I have ever sat down and talked with. Just goes to show you that i had a wrong judgement and was greatly surprised by my finding.